Katie Meyer’s family files a wrongful death lawsuit against Stanford

Stanford University goaltender Katie Meyer was facing disciplinary action before she tragically took her own life in February, according to a wrongful death lawsuit her parents filed against the university.

Meyer was said to have been riding her bike one summer when she spilled coffee on a Stanford football player who allegedly sexually assaulted a football player — who was an underage at the time — according to the lawsuit obtained by USA Today Sports. Mayer, who was captain of the women’s soccer team at Stanford, was served notice of impending disciplinary action over the incident, which occurred in August, the evening of her death, according to the lawsuit.

“The Stanford after-hours disciplinary charge, the reckless nature and submissive manner of Katie caused Katie to suffer an acute stress reaction that impulsively led to her suicide,” the complaint reads.

“Katie’s suicide was completed without planning and in response only to the shocking and deeply distressing information she received from Stanford University while she was alone in her room without any support or resources.”

Meyer reportedly received the notice after 7 p.m., when the campus counseling resources had already shut down, according to the complaint, which also notes that Meyer “immediately responded to the email expressing how “shocked and distraught” she was at her accusation and threat. exclusion from the university.”

Katie Meyer #19 of the Stanford Cardinal defends for goal against the North Carolina Tar Heels during the Division I Women's Soccer Championship at Avaya Stadium on December 8, 2019.
Katie Meyer #19 of the Stanford Cardinal defends for goal against the North Carolina Tar Heels during the Division I Women’s Soccer Championship at Avaya Stadium on December 8, 2019.
NCAA Photos via Getty Images

The lawsuit alleges that Stanford “failed to respond to Katie’s expression of distress, instead ignoring it and scheduling a meeting 3 days later via email,” and how university staff “made no effort whatsoever to check on Katie’s well-being, either from Through a simple phone call or a personal care check.”

Di Mostovi, Stanford’s assistant vice president for external communications, stated that the community office chief had reached out to Meyer “several days” before the late student-athlete received the official letter. Mostofi said that the OCS person “gave Katie until that date to provide any further information for consideration,” and that Meyer “did not provide any information and OCS informed her on the evening of February 28th that the matter would go to a hearing.”

“The Stanford community continues to grieve Katie’s tragic death and we sympathize with her family for the unimaginable pain Katie’s passing has caused,” Mostofi said in an email to USA Today. “However, we strongly disagree with any assertion that the university was responsible for her death.”

Katie Meyer and parents
Meyer pictured with her parents.
Family Bulletin
Katie Meyer #19 of the Stanford Cardinal defends goal against Alicia Russo #19 of the North Carolina Tar Heels during the Division I Women's Soccer Championship at Avaya Stadium on December 8, 2019.
Katie Meyer #19 of the Stanford Cardinal defends goal against Alicia Russo #19 of the North Carolina Tar Heels during the Division I Women’s Soccer Championship at Avaya Stadium on December 8, 2019.
NCAA Photos via Getty Images

Meyer’s notice reportedly contained a phone number to contact for “immediate support,” and he was informed that the resource’s availability was 24 hours a day, seven days a week, according to Mostofi. Meyer is also said to have been “expressly informed that this was not a decision that she had done anything wrong, and OCS offered to meet with her to discuss the matter if she wished.”

The football player did not request any punishment that would “impact” Meyer’s life during the disciplinary process, according to USA Today.

Mayer was 22 years old at the time of her death.

Goaltender Katie Meyer #19 of the Stanford Cardinal passes the ball to a teammate against the North Carolina Tar Heels during the Division I Women's Soccer Tournament at Avaya Stadium on December 8, 2019.
Goaltender Katie Meyer #19 of the Stanford Cardinal passes the ball to a teammate against the North Carolina Tar Heels during the Division I Women’s Soccer Tournament at Avaya Stadium on December 8, 2019.
NCAA Photos via Getty Images

Meyer, who is from Burbank, Calif., helped Stanford claim the 2019 NCAA Women’s Soccer Championship. I majored in international relations and majored in history.

If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts or are experiencing a mental health crisis and live in New York City, you can call 1-888-NYC-WELL for free, confidential crisis counseling. If you live outside the five boroughs, you can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 24/7 at 1-800-273-8255 or go to SuicidePreventionLifeline.org.

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